Resident preparEDNESS

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    HOME PREPARATION

Prepare your home to keep out the cold with insulation, caulking, and weather stripping. Learn how to keep pipes from freezing. Install and test smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors with battery backups.

  • Prepare your home to keep out the cold with insulation, caulking and weather stripping. Learn how to keep pipes from freezing. Install and test smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors with battery backups.
  • Gather supplies in case you need to stay home for several days without power. Keep in mind each person’s specific needs, including medication. Do not forget the needs of pets. Have extra batteries for radios and flashlights.
  • ***Safely clear propane tanks, gas lines, chimneys and ventilation flues of snow. See warning: https://www.placer.ca.gov/5504/Reminder-to-clear-propane-tanks***
  • Winter storms can cause power outages that can last up to several days, affecting both you and the surrounding area. hat’s why it’s important to have a week’s supply of food and prescriptions. 
  • Winter storms can easily break tree branches, so trim weak or damaged branches around your home, and don’t park your car under trees. And after you’ve parked, don’t leave your wipers raised. contrary to popular belief, doing so increases the chance of wiper damage.

Home preparation

STAYING WARM WITHOUT POWER


When the power goes out in winter, the cold can be deadly. But even without power, there are still ways to warm things up. Closing blinds and curtains and closing room doors can help contain heat, and stuffing towels in the cracks under doors can help keep the warmth in. Don’t forget about eating and staying hydrated. Food provides energy to warm the body.

WarmWithNoPower2020 WINTER AND PETS

Don't forget about your pets this winter! Make sure they have a warm, dry place to rest with plenty of food and water. 

winter_pets_2017


  VEHICLE PREPARATION

winter driving

  • Is your vehicle ready for the winter? Watch this brief video to learn what needs to be in your emergency kit and how to winterize your vehicle: youtu.be/hcwl_bnID50 

  • Create an emergency supply kit for your car

  • Keep the gas tank full.

TRAVEL PREPARATION

  • Are you planning a lengthy trip by car this winter? Know how to prepare, and know that the decisions that need to be made will differ depending on where you are on the winter travel timeline: youtu.be/ZzjarXUsDtA

  • Share your travel plans with friends and family. Before leaving, check road conditions and the weather forecast so you know what to expect. 
  • Check out your local roads cameras to see what the conditions look like: http://www.magnifeye.com/webcams.php#map 

BRIDGES FREEZE FIRST

You’ve probably seen road signs advising that bridges freeze before roads, but do you know why? Having open air underneath the bridge means the cold air surrounds the bridge both above and below.

If there’s even the chance that a bridge might be frozen, SLOW DOWN! And do it before you cross the bridge — changing speed on ice is dangerous.

FREEZING RAIN

Compared to a typical snowstorm, freezing rain is much more hazardous — especially on the road. While both are dangerous, it’s far easier to lose control of your vehicle on icy pavement, not to mention the increased risk of falling branches and powerlines.

BLACK ICE

When recent rain or snowmelt comes into contact with freezing temperatures, black ice can form — and you might not even see it. And while black ice is more prevalent at night, it can often stick around for the morning commute. Avoid driving if you can.

AVALANCHES WHILE DRIVING

Avalanches can pose a very real danger to drivers on mountain roads. If you are caught in an avalanche, stay in your vehicle and turn off the engine to avoid carbon monoxide poisoning from a clogged tailpipe.

Avoid danger in the first place by heeding warning signs and not driving around barriers - and be weather ready by equipping your car with an emergency kit.

SNOW SQUALLS

Snow squalls are intense bursts of snow and wind with whiteout visibility that are extremely dangerous, especially while on the road. The National Weather Service helps you be ready by issuing Snow Squall Warnings that can trigger a Wireless Emergency Alert on your phone. If you receive one, know that a snow squall is occurring or imminent, and slow down or delay travel. 

FIRST SNOW

While lots of snow in the middle of winter can certainly cause dangerous travel conditions, many times it’s the first little bit of snow of the season that can cause accidents. Be extra careful as you and other drivers adjust to driving in poor conditions. Slow down, don’t use cruise control, and keep your distance from other vehicles. Don’t let the first snow sneak up on you!

SUN GLARE

Even on a nice winter day, the low sun angle can make driving hazardous. Freshly fallen snow can add more glare to your drive. Have a pair of sunglasses on hand, slow down, and leave plenty of distance between you and other vehicles. Don’t let sun glare sneak up on you!

RAIN WHEN IT IS NEAR FREEZING

Rain may seem like less of a winter driving hazard than snow, but when temperatures are near freezing, that’s not the case. Ice can form quickly and make roads slick. In these conditions, slow down, don’t use cruise control, and keep plenty of distance between you and other vehicles. Don’t let this winter hazard sneak up on you! 

FREEZING DRIZZLE

When surface temperatures are below freezing, drizzle will form a thin layer of ice on the roads. This difficult-to-see ice can cause very dangerous travel conditions. When it’s drizzling in the winter, slow down, don’t use cruise control, and keep your distance from other vehicles. Don’t let freezing drizzle sneak up on you!

RAIN AFTER A LONG DRY STRETCH

You wouldn’t think a little bit of rain could make the roads slippery, but after a long dry stretch, it can happen. This is because oil and debris accumulate on the road during the dry period. Once the rain starts falling, roads become slick. Slow down in these situations. This is one of those hazards that can sneak up on you!

DENSE FOG

Visibility can change quickly in fog, creating hazardous driving conditions. Slow down, use your low-beam headlights, and leave plenty of distance between you and other vehicles. Don’t let fog sneak up on you!

ICE AND SNOW

Winter driving can be hazardous. One simple way to keep yourself and everyone on the road safe is to slow down. Remember, “Ice and snow, take it slow”. 

Do your part to keep everyone safe on the roads this winter. Learn more at weather.gov/winter